The Consulting Writer

aka The Frazzled Mom

Featured Author: Michael Brookes

Michael Brookes

Author of Faust 2.0

Faust20CoverMed

Please be sure to check out the link for more information:

https://santaflash.wordpress.com/authors/michael-brookes/

Why do you write?
MB: I write to tell stories. I’m full of them and I enjoy telling them. I also enjoy the act of writing, of taking an idea and crafting it into something that people can read.
Why did you write this particular story?
MB: I have an interest in the metaphysical and my work in video games also stems from a love of technology. One of the joys of writing is to explore ideas, to try and answer questions. Faust 2.0 came from two questions. The first was if an entity like a demon found itself in a new realm, such as the Internet, how would it react? The second was that if an entity emerged on the Internet (an idea postulated by the idea of a technological singularity), how would it identify itself?
How do you create your characters?
MB: Characters come from many sources, in some cases they spring out of nowhere, for example Dan, the hacker in the story came with the idea for the story itself. I wanted an almost stereo typical character, but also to make him appear as a villain in the story, yet in many ways he’s also a victim. The hero of the story, Sarah Mitchell I created. I wanted a flawed hero, but someone strong enough to see the job through. As for Morton, the mysterious lawyer, he was great fun to write and we’ll be seeing more of him and Sarah in the future.
Where do your ideas come from?
MB: Most of my ideas seem to come when I’m driving, I’ve no idea why. When I’m trying to fall asleep is another time ideas seem to slip in to my mind. I’m not as fond of those as it usually means I get little sleep that night.
What are the negatives/positives of self-publishing that you’ve found to be true?
MB: Self-publishing is very much a mixed bag, it’s main strength is the freedom it provides. You have complete control over every part of the process. The downside is that it is a lot of work. Writing the book is only the first step, you then have to package and promote it. Self-publishing also comes with responsibilities, with it being so easy to publish you’re own book you have to take that seriously. There is some stigma with the quality of some indie books, which is a shame as I have read many fine indie authors. It is up to up to us as authors to make sure that what we release is the best it can be.
How did you come up with the title?
MB: I’m a fan of the classics and the story of Faust in particular. In some ways it is a modern version of the classic Faust tale.
Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
MB: That things and people are not always what they seem.
If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
MB: That’s a difficult question. I think I’d choose Clive Barker. As a writer he writes great and interesting stories. He also works in different mediums which is something I admire.
Can you share a little of your current work with us?
MB: As well as novels I enjoy writing short fiction, here’s one of my favourites:
Clowns
Lying on my bed and see my room full of clowns. Happy clowns, sad clowns, laughing clowns, even a tall gaunt clown with spindly legs. My mummy thinks I like them and keeps buying me more. I wish I could tell her how much they frighten me. Everywhere I look, I see another clown’s face.One hundred different clowns, none of them the same. I say my prayers with mummy then count them before I sleep. Snuggled in my duvet I count them once again. This time the number comes up short and there’s a rustle under the bed.
What were the challenges (research, literary, psychological, and logistical) in bringing your story to life?
MB: The story came together nicely, it’s based on subjects I’m familiar with so I it didn’t need too much research. The logistics for writing is always tricky, work occupies a lot of my time, so I have to write around that. I love doing it though, so it’s no great hardship.
Favorite Horror villains from literature
MB: Another tricky question. Pennywise the clown from Stephen King’s IT would be high on the list, a good scary character.

Thanks for the opportunity!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on June 7, 2013 by in Books and tagged , , , , , , , , .
Follow The Consulting Writer on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,355 other followers

Blog Stats

  • 8,784 hits
I review for BookLook Bloggers

Do It Yourself

Reading/Writing

Reviews Published Professional Reader
%d bloggers like this: