The Consulting Writer

aka The Frazzled Mom

Edible Idioms

I enjoy discovering new idioms. Even as a native English speaker, I still find ones I don’t know. Here’s a list of Edible Idioms, safe for human consumption. There are so many and this list, I’m sure, doesn’t cover all of them.

Without realizing it, I use idioms daily. In fact, one I use often is “slow as molasses in January“. It’s often in reference to how extremely, painfully, slow my kids are at getting ready for school. If I timed them, I think molasses in January actually moves faster.  🙂

  • Apple of my eye –  my favorite person
  • Busy as popcorn on a skillet – Very active. I’ve not heard of this one. Usually, it’s busy as a bee or busy as a beaver.
  • Easy as pie (as easy as apple pie) – Very easy
  • Flat as a pancake (flat as a flounder??)- Really flat, well, like a pancake
  • Hungry as a bear (so hungry I could eat a horse…eww) – Very hungry
  • Nutty as a fruitcake – Crazy
  • Sour as vinegar – Ill-natured and disagreeable
  • Sweet as honey – Very sweet, charming
  • Thick as pea soup – Very thick. I heard this one in the Nightmare Before Christmas Movie. The fog was as thick as pea soup! No, thicker!
  • Warm as toast – Very warm and cozy
  • Bad apple – Bad person who negatively impacts a group, like one bad apple spoils the bunch
  • Bad egg – Bad person who had not proved to be as good as he promised
  • Bear fruit – To produce a result that is wanted or desired
  • Big cheese – Important, successful or influential person
  • Big enchilada – The most important person in the group
  • Bite off more than you can chew – Try to do more than you can handle
  • Bite the hand that feeds you – To show ingratitude towards someone who’s helped you
  • Bitter pill to swallow – News that’s hard to take
  • Bottom of the food chain – The position/person with the least amount of power or influence
  • Bread and butter – Someone’s basic income or livelihood
  • Bring home the bacon – Earn a salary or money from a job
  • Butter up – Flatter someone in the opens to receive a special favor from them in return
  • Buy a lemon – Buy something worthless, a common concern when buying a used car
  • Cake and Eat it too – Wanting more than the fair share or need
  • Chew the fat – to talk at leisure, but also at length and in no hurry
  • Coffee break – A break from work to eat or drink
  • Compare apples and oranges – Compare the similarity in things that are very different
  • Cook someone’s goose – To cause someone’s downfall
  • Cook up a storm – Cook a large quantity
  • Cool as a cucumber – Extremely calm and doesn’t get easily upset
  • Couch potato – Someone who watches a lot of TV. Is this a thing anymore? What do they call someone who streams along on their tablet, or plays a lot on their ipad?
  • Cream of the crop – The best of the best
  • Cream puff – A weakling or wimp, someone easy to overwhelm or beat out
  • Cup of Joe – A cup of coffee
  • Cup of tea – Something the person likes or excels in
  • Cut the mustard – Do what is necessary, to perform the necessary task or perform up to expectations/standards
  • Cry over spilt milk – To be upset about something that can’t be changed, something that happened in the past and often a minor incident. My niece actually cried, but it was literally over spilt milk that got on her pretty dress.
  • Drop like a hot potato – To immediately disassociate yourself from someone or something
  • Eat crow – Admit a mistake, usually publicly
  • Eat dirt – Be humble, to admit you’re wrong
  • Eat high on the hog –  To prosper and eat really well
  • Eat humble pie – To be forced to admit you’re wrong and apologize
  • Eat like a bird – Eat a small amount
  • Eat like a horse – Eat a lot
  • Eat one’s heart out – To be jealous
  • Eat out – Dine in a restaurant
  • Eat out of her hands – Do what she wants
  • Eat us out of house and home – Eat a lot
  • Eat your words – Take back words
  • Egg on – Urge someone
  • Egg on your face – humiliation or embarrassment from something you’d done (Queen helped us with this one in “We will rock you”)
  • Everything from soup to nuts – A wide variety of items
  • Fat is in the fire – Big problem
  • Feast or famine – Either too much or not enough
  • Fine kettle of fish – A mess
  • Finger in the pie – Participating
  • Food for thought – Something to think about
  • Forbidden fruit – Something banned
  • For peanuts – Inexpensive
  • Freeze one’s buns off – To be very, very cold
  • Full of beans – Feel energetic
  • Go bananas – Excited or crazy
  • Goose is cooked – Finished or in trouble
  • Gravy train – Well-paying job for minimal work
  • Greatest thing since sliced bread – Something that is excellent
  • Half a loaf is better than none – Something is better than nothing
  • Half-baked – Not thought through
  • Hand to someone on a silver platter – Cater to someone
  • Hard nut to crack – Difficult person
  • Have a lot on one’s plate – Very busy
  • Have a sweet tooth – Like sweet foods
  • Have bigger fish to fry – Have more important things to do
  • Have egg on your face – Be embarrassed
  • Have one’s cake and eat it too – Having something both ways
  • Hot potato – A controversial question or issue that may involve unpleasant or dangerous consequences for those involved
  • In a jam – In a difficult situation
  • In a nutshell – In summary, a brief statement
  • In a pickle – In trouble (like “in a jam”)
  • Life is a bowl of cherries – Life is good
  • Like taking candy from a baby – Very easy
  • Like two peas in a pod – To be similar in interests, dispositions or beliefs
  • Low hanging fruit – Easy to get or do
  • Meat and potatoes – Basics, the fundamental part of something
  • Melt in one’s mouth – Delicious, tastes very good
  • Not for all the tea in China – Not for any price, not for anything at all
  • Not my cup of tea – Not to their liking, not something they’re good at
  • Not know beans about – Unfamiliar or ignorant
  • Not worth a hill of beans – Not valuable
  • Nuts about something – To like it a lot
  • Nutty as a fruitcake – Crazy
  • Packed in like sardines – Extremely crowded
  • Piece of cake – Easy. I once said washing dishes was a “piece of cake”. My father misunderstood, thought I was being smart with my mother, and grounded me with the punishment of washing all dishes for two months.
  • Pie in the sky – A dream, something good that’s unlikely to happen
  • Put all of one’s eggs in one basket – relay on one single thing
  • Rotten to the core – Very bad, corrupt
  • Salt of the Earth – Ordinary people
  • Sell like hotcakes – Sell a lot or to sell very fast
  • Slice of the pie – A share of something, a portion of money or profits
  • Small potatoes – Unimportant
  • Spill the beans – Tell a secret or reveal the truth
  • Stick to your ribs – Last a long time
  • Sugarcoat – Gloss over bad information
  • Take with a grain of salt – Don’t take something seriously
  • That’s the way the cookie crumbles – Things happen
  • There is no such thing as a free lunch – Can’t get something for nothing
  • Top banana – Leader (see Big Cheese, Big Enchilada)
  • Use your noodle – use your brain
  • Variety is the spice of life – Differences give life interest
  • Walk on eggshells – Be cautious, to be diplomatic or inoffensive
  • Whole enchilada – The entire thing
  • Worm food – Dead and buried
  • Worth your salt – Worthwhile
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2 comments on “Edible Idioms

  1. Success Inspirers' World
    July 19, 2017

    This is good. You put in a lot of work.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth Los
      July 19, 2017

      Thanks! I pulled from several websites. I know I haven’t even exhausted the list. I had no idea there were so many!

      Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on July 18, 2017 by in Daily Prompt, Daily Ramblings and tagged , .
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